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​Rosie Coghlan

Community Corrections Officer, Wagga Wagga Community Corrections
Two years with Corrective Services NSW

After growing up in the city, joining Community Corrections in Wagga Wagga provided the perfect challenge Rosie Coghlan was looking for.

The 27-year-old has been a Community Corrections Officer for the past two years with her job specialising in assisting offenders on court-based community-service orders undertake unpaid work for community organisations.

Ms Coghlan is among the more than 9,000 Corrective Services NSW staff being celebrated for their commitment to community safety on National Corrections Day, Friday 18 January.

“Not only is helping offenders gain work experience vital for sustainable education or employment, it offers a sense of purpose where they can contribute to the family unit, independence and positive relationships,” Ms Coghlan says.

Offenders on community-service orders in the Wagga Wagga region undertake a variety of unpaid work including maintenance of local sports sites, such as the Illabo Motorsport Track, the REA Wagga Horse Trials cross country course and highway rest stops.

“We receive a lot of positive feedback about the community service work we do for the Wagga Wagga City Council including care and maintenance of the local cemeteries,” Ms Coghlan says.

“The graffiti removal project is also meaningful as it was set up for the offenders to take down the graffiti themselves so they understand the effects of their offending behaviour.”

Ms Coghlan has also been working with a young adult offender who was released from custody to Wagga Wagga for a fresh start.

“He told me this is the longest period of time he has remained out of prison and in the community and that being surrounded by supportive people made him feel like he belonged,” Ms Coghlan says.

“It does show that when they’re ready to accept our help it leads to small wins.”

The 2019 National Corrections Day theme is Working Corrections, focussing on inmate industries and the work of Community Corrections officers, who supervise offenders on court-ordered community work.

There are nearly 1,600 Community Corrections staff working at more than 130 reporting locations across the state, supervising offenders on parole and court-ordered community work.

Rosie Coghlan