Justice Home > Corrective Services

​Christine Chenoweth

Community Corrections Officer, Bowral Community Corrections
Seven years with Corrective Services NSW

Christine Chenoweth’s path to supervising offenders on the frontline wasn’t an obvious or smooth one - from business administration trainee to maternity leave and a brief stint in retail, her career has taken many unexpected detours.

After seven years’ service with Corrective Services NSW, the Bowral-based Community Corrections Officer is glad for the time she spends working with offenders on community service orders.

“Community service work is a really big passion of mine because it’s not only really important for the offenders’ rehabilitation, but it’s a great opportunity for the community,” Ms Chenoweth says.

“We have had offenders who do their community work and then continue to volunteer after their order has finished, and others who have been given jobs off the back of their community service work.

“It’s great for them to be working alongside people in the community, learning a good work ethic and how to respect people, and receiving praise for the work they’re doing.”

Ms Chenoweth is among the more than 9,000 Corrective Services NSW staff being celebrated for their commitment to community safety on National Corrections Day, Friday 18 January.

Ms Chenoweth began her career with Corrective Services NSW as a business administration trainee in 2006. Her first taste of Community Corrections came in 2008 when she spent four months on secondment in community service administration.

She says she has seen offenders change their lives for the better with strong guidance, supervision and community service work.

“One of my habitual offenders gained a job from his community service work and has stayed out of prison for the past two years. Our job is about giving them the tools to change their lives for themselves and reduce reoffending,” the 33-year-old says.

The 2019 National Corrections Day theme is Working Corrections, focussing on inmate industries and the work of Community Corrections officers, who supervise offenders on court-ordered community work.

There are nearly 1,600 Community Corrections staff working at more than 130 reporting locations across the state, supervising offenders on parole and court-ordered community work.